Month: March 2001

Making the Most of Your Inventory (1)

Making the Most of Your Inventory Eight great ways to earn a profit from work you’ve already done! Copyright 2001 by Dana Cassell One of the neatest things about writing for a living (even if it’s only a part-time living) is that we get to re-sell our inventory. “What inventory?” you ask. All that information you have stuffed in file folders and computer files. You know — the interviews you’ve conducted and transcribed. The how-to tips and advice and backgrounders you’ve gathered from all those experts whose brains you’ve picked. The statistics you’ve dug out of government studies and academic research. The anecdotes you’ve collected from people who have experienced what you’ve written about. Chances are, you have a bulging manila or hanging file folder for each article you’ve written, stuffed full of “inventory” — some of which you used in the article, much of it sitting unused. And not using that inventory is what keeps so many writers from earning a decent living — because time is such a precious commodity for the writer. You are limited by the number of hours in a week or a month as to how many projects you can research and write. But all that “inventory” hidden away in those folders is virtually time-free. You’ve already spent the time to gather it. About all you have to do now is package it...

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Customer Service: Accept Responsibility for Fixing Errors (1)

Customer Service: Accept Responsibility for Fixing Errors The key to integrity online? Accept resonsibility! © 2001 by jl scott [Editor’s Note: I received three articles in close succession, offering different slants on customer service. jl scott (lower case at the author’s request) talks about accepting responsibility, Tim Geiger discusses building loyalty through great service and great employees, and Wally Bock demonstrates the power of a strong, informed staff through his own experience. At the bottom of each, you’ll find direct links to the others.] While I was growing up, my daddy used to tell me, “It’s your decision. You have to make it. But be prepared to take responsibility for whatever decision you make.” Yikes! Now, THAT will make a kid stop and think! Stepping up to the plate to take responsibility is one of the things I look for in those I choose to do business with. There can be no higher ethical standard. In our online businesses, we make decisions every day. Even a small decision can come back and bite us in the butt. We make mistakes. We make thoughtless choices. We sometimes get involved with online programs without thinking about the repercussions. Stuff happens. The question isn’t whether we’re smart enough to avoid all that. We can’t. The question is whether we’re willing to be accountable when we screw up. Now, is this about customer...

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BOOK EXPO OF AMERICA 2001: W., Harry Potter, and Dot-Bomb Retrenchment (1)

BOOK EXPO OF AMERICA 2001: W., Harry Potter, and Dot-Bomb Retrenchment An intriguing report of the biggest stories from the 2001 Book Expo of America. By Shel Horowitz FREE SPEECH, CENSORSHIP, AND GEORGE W. The biggest story I found at this year’s BEA was a suspenseful tale of deceit, intrigue, back-stabbing, and heavy-handed arm-twisting–a story that may have affected the outcome of the 2000 US presidential election. I interviewed Jim Hatfield author of Fortunate Son, an unauthorized biography of George W. Bush. Hatfield’s book was originally published by St.Martin’s in October 1999, in an 80,000-copy first run (that’s pretty large). That publisher, one day after issuing a press release noting that the book was “scrupulously corroborated and meticulously fact-checked,” recalled all copies from bookstores, after some apparent heavy pressure from the Bush team, both publicly and behind the scenes. Hatfield noted, “most subjects of a hard-hitting biography will ignore it. Elder Bush [W’s father, former president George H.W. Bush] gave an exclusive on Fox. He said the book claimed he bribed a judge; that’s NOT in the book.” And Bush Senior also claimed the Republicans had talked to Hatfield’s lawyers–but Hatfield says his lawyers laughed when they heard that claim. George W. Bush “said the book was ‘ridiculous. It’s science fiction.’ But he never denied the cocaine allegations.” Behind the scenes, Bush’s lawyers found out about Hatfield’s criminal past;...

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What is Creative Commons?

What is Creative Commons? By S. Housley Creative Commons is a nonprofit organization that allows artists, authors, publishers and musicians the option of creating and defining a flexible copyright for their creative works. Creative Commons was officially launched in 2001 by a group of intellectual property experts, lawyers and web publishers. Creative Commons licenses cover art, music, and writing, but is not designed for software. A Creative Commons license allows creators to place conditions on their copyrights. Traditionally, copyrights restrict the rights of others from modifying or distributing copywritten works. Creative Commons licenses offer flexibility by allowing the creator (copyright holder) the ability to choose what limitations they want in place with respect to specific copywritten works. How Creative Commons Works Creators login to the Creative Commons System and select what restrictions, attributes or modifications they wish to assign to their creative works. The Creative Commons site will then produce a Creative Commons license for the creative works expressed in three ways. Creative Commons will provide: a commons deed clearly stating the licensing rights in plain English, legal code for the license, and a digital license code. The digital code can be embedded into websites and search engines. Yahoo has a new Creative Commons search which identifies works and recognizes any licensing conditions. Searches can be conducted for different types of licenses. The Creative Commons site also provides a...

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Making the Most of Your Inventory

Making the Most of Your Inventory Eight great ways to earn a profit from work you’ve already done! Copyright 2001 by Dana Cassell One of the neatest things about writing for a living (even if it’s only a part-time living) is that we get to re-sell our inventory. “What inventory?” you ask. All that information you have stuffed in file folders and computer files. You know — the interviews you’ve conducted and transcribed. The how-to tips and advice and backgrounders you’ve gathered from all those experts whose brains you’ve picked. The statistics you’ve dug out of government studies and academic research. The anecdotes you’ve collected from people who have experienced what you’ve written about. Chances are, you have a bulging manila or hanging file folder for each article you’ve written, stuffed full of “inventory” — some of which you used in the article, much of it sitting unused. And not using that inventory is what keeps so many writers from earning a decent living — because time is such a precious commodity for the writer. You are limited by the number of hours in a week or a month as to how many projects you can research and write. But all that “inventory” hidden away in those folders is virtually time-free. You’ve already spent the time to gather it. About all you have to do now is package it...

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