Month: March 1996

Request a Link From Our Site to Yours

Request a Link From Our Site to Yours Thank you for requesting a link. With dozens of link requests every month, and most of them obviously generic letters that show no understanding of our sites, we’ve had to initiate a procedure to screen out the obvious misfits. It’s no longer possible to visit every single site that requests a link, so instead, please answer these four questions. If your answers match our linking profile, we will visit your site, and if we like what we see, we’re delighted to cross-link. Our main site, established in 1996, gets at least 30,000 visitors a month, with spikes up to 90,000. Please note that our willingness to link relies on showing familiarity with our sites, the quality of your site, and its relevance to our readers. While high page rank or traffic is certainly nice, it’s more important to us that you provide useful content that matches our readers. If you have no original, no-charge content, your content is obscene/racist/hatemongering, or you offer nothing but a link farm or affiliate listing, please don’t bother. We do not link to those types of sites. Name Website URL E-Mail Which of our sites did you want to cross-link? (Please check all that apply) http://www.frugalmarketing.com/ http://www.principledprofits.com/ http://www.frugalfun.com/ What about the site(s) helped you decide to request a link? Please briefly describe your site, and why...

Read More

Create Posters and Fliers That Stop Prospects In Their Tracks (2)

Create Posters and Fliers That Stop Prospects In Their Tracks Learn to create posters and fliers that achieve powerful marketing results. by Shel Horowitz, copyright 1996. All rights reserved. Taken from Marketing Without Megabucks. Design Principles A good visual piece, whether it’s a business card, flier, display ad, or even a direct mail letter, should grab the reader, and be easy to look at. Don’t make it too busy and jumpy, unless you’re selling heavy metal music or electro-convulsive therapy. And let the tone of the visuals reinforce your message: Lead with your most important point, in a large headline Restate the point early in the body copy Consider using a secondary headline, either immediately next to the main headline or in a different part of the ad Use white space as a graphic element Choose graphics (if the piece uses them) that your readers will want to look at, but that are also closely related to your message Frame a partial page with a border (otherwise, your ad will float off visually into editorial matter-or worse, into someone else’s ad!) Break up large areas of text with subheads or graphic elements Use a slogan, logo, and/or typeface to project a unified image Posters and Fliers A flier is a piece of paper that you hand to someone, post for people to see, insert in a newspaper, or deliver...

Read More

How to Write and Place Radio Spots for Maximum Marketing Return at Lowest Cost (2)

How to Write and Place Radio Spots for Maximum Marketing Return at Lowest Cost Step-by-step guide to preparing successful radio commercials. by Shel Horowitz, copyright 1996. Taken from Marketing Without Megabucks. Just as in a public service announcement, a radio commercial must effectively reach listeners. You can be as simple or extravagant as you want, but keep the message focused and understandable. Your wording should be concise and to the point, just like a good PSA–but you can and should be more blatantly commercial. You are competing in the background with whatever the listener is doing, and people will not retain everything they hear. So stay away from $100 words, and repeat the most important information. Repetition allows the listener the chance to grab a pencil and jot down the details. Jonathan Price, a former radio employee, urges you to mention your business name at least twice per ad: once toward the beginning, and again at the very end, with contact information. Repeating this information at the end cements the listener’s identification of the product with your business, rather than with the generic idea of using the kinds of products or services you sell. In other words, if you run Heavenly Heat Hot Tubs, you want to not only tempt the listener into trying a hot tub, but coming to you, rather than a competitor. Remember, again, that your...

Read More

How to Write and Place Radio Spots for Maximum Marketing Return at Lowest Cost (1)

How to Write and Place Radio Spots for Maximum Marketing Return at Lowest Cost Step-by-step guide to preparing successful radio commercials. By Shel Horowitz, copyright 1996. Taken from Marketing without Megabucks, and also appears in Grassroots Marketing: Getting Noticed in a Noisy World. Just as in a public service announcement, a radio commercial must effectively reach listeners. You can be as simple or extravagant as you want, but keep the message focused and understandable. Your wording should be concise and to the point, just like a good PSA–but you can and should be more blatantly commercial. You are competing in the background with whatever the listener is doing, and people will not retain everything they hear. So stay away from $100 words, and repeat the most important information. Repetition allows the listener the chance to grab a pencil and jot down the details. Jonathan Price, a former radio employee, urges you to mention your business name at least twice per ad: once toward the beginning, and again at the very end, with contact information. Repeating this information at the end cements the listener’s identification of the product with your business, rather than with the generic idea of using the kinds of products or services you sell. In other words, if you run Heavenly Heat Hot Tubs, you want to not only tempt the listener into trying a hot tub,...

Read More

How to Write and Place Radio Spots for Maximum Marketing Return at Lowest Cost

How to Write and Place Radio Spots for Maximum Marketing Return at Lowest Cost Step-by-step guide to preparing successful radio commercials. by Shel Horowitz, copyright 1996. Taken from Marketing Without Megabucks. Just as in a public service announcement, a radio commercial must effectively reach listeners. You can be as simple or extravagant as you want, but keep the message focused and understandable. Your wording should be concise and to the point, just like a good PSA–but you can and should be more blatantly commercial. You are competing in the background with whatever the listener is doing, and people will not retain everything they hear. So stay away from $100 words, and repeat the most important information. Repetition allows the listener the chance to grab a pencil and jot down the details. Jonathan Price, a former radio employee, urges you to mention your business name at least twice per ad: once toward the beginning, and again at the very end, with contact information. Repeating this information at the end cements the listener’s identification of the product with your business, rather than with the generic idea of using the kinds of products or services you sell. In other words, if you run Heavenly Heat Hot Tubs, you want to not only tempt the listener into trying a hot tub, but coming to you, rather than a competitor. Remember, again, that your...

Read More
  • 1
  • 2

Recent Comments

    Archives

    Categories