Month: March 1980

Billboards, Banners, and the Evolving Nature of Online Advertising (1)

Billboards, Banners, and the Evolving Nature of Online Advertising Two authors explore the comparison of Web banners to highway billboards. by Dan Wasserman and Anne McKay Editor’s Note: I am combining (with permission) two postings from the Internet Advertising Discussion List. The complete I-Advertising Archives are at http://guava.ease.lsoft.com/archives/i-advertising.html Dan: All media have gone through an initial stage where the commercial message was composed by the medium itself rather than creative experts. Newspapers and magazines developed ads for their clients, radio stations have commercial copy writers, and many TV stations still will shoot a “cheap” commercial. This phase was always the least effective use of the medium as a commercial vehicle. It took time for standards to evolve and for the respective areas of expertise (media and creative) to diverge. Often in the early days, the ads appearing on/in a new medium were enhancements, or modifications, of the highest level of the art in the prior medium (e.g. early radio was newspaper copy read live and TV started basically as radio with pictures). On the web, some ads have mimicked TV ads. The evolution to a unique and higher plane is what is currently happening with the web. At present, banners ARE effectively billboards, or perhaps abbreviated magazine ads. Although they have the power of interactivity, if the message is unclear (or has no relevance to the user at that...

Read More

10 Ways to Realize Hidden Opportunities

10 Ways to Realize Hidden Opportunities By Jeff Beals “Great moments are born from great opportunities,” said the late Herb Brooks, one of the world’s most famous hockey coaches.  Brooks certainly seized opportunity during his career.  He agreed to coach the 1980 U.S. Olympic team that beat the “unbeatable” Soviet Union in Lake Placid, New York during the famous “Miracle on Ice” game on the way to winning the gold medal.  It was a modern-day “David vs. Goliath” matchup. Many coaches would refuse such an overwhelmingly difficult job.  In fact, several did.  But Brooks saw opportunity in the monumental challenge of leading a bunch of young, amateur, college all-stars against the essentially professional players of the Soviet Union and other European hockey powers.  That opportunity paid off, to say the least. Whether you’re talking about sports, business or any other subject matter, seeking, finding and capitalizing on opportunity are among the most important things a professional must do.     There’s one big problem with opportunity, however.  It is often hard to find and even harder to harness. “We are all faced with a series of great opportunities brilliantly disguised as impossible situations,” said Charles Swindoll, an American religious author. I agree wholeheartedly with Swindoll’s characterization.  The best opportunities are often hidden.  They are often located in places we least expect to find them and are presented by people we...

Read More

About Shel Horowitz

About Shel Horowitz: ethical/Green marketing expert, writer, international speaker, consultant, community organizer, frugalist Shel was still a teenager when he started doing publicity and marketing for grass-roots community organizations with zero promotional budget. There wasn’t even money available for stamps, so he used to hand-deliver press releases on a three-speed bicycle, Trained as a journalist, he first became aware of the power of the news media when a local paper refused to print meeting notices he wrote for a controversial group—but gave extensive news coverage to its refusal. Now, for over twenty years, he’s helped businesses, nonprofits, and community groups get their message out to the public with little or no expenditure. After finishing Antioch College at age 19, Shel had to come to terms with his own work history: career paths not only in writing and marketing/PR, but also in radio, teaching, arts, food service, office systems, community organizing, and environmental issues. Putting together his own first résumés led to a new career direction: résumé writing and career services. Shel quickly realized he had the ability to discover a job candidate’s best strengths and present them so those are highlighted while weaknesses are downplayed. In short, he turned résumé writing into a marketing function. A native of New York City, he returned there to work at two literary agencies as a manuscript reader, and then worked for a...

Read More

Direct Mail Strategies: How To Get a 50% D.M. Response Rate With A Stroke Of The Pen

Direct Mail Strategies: How To Get a 50% D.M. Response Rate With A Stroke Of The Pen By Michael Kaselnak Did you know that your clients and customers are getting hit with approximately 3,000 advertising messages a day! This barrage of advertising noise is making it increasingly difficult for prospective customers to hear what your business has to offer. So, what can a business do to break through this noise and actually have their messages heard by their targeted customers? Many businesses have just simply started to advertise more and louder…which simply compounds the overall problem. Some have tried gimmicks and sales. Still others have simply accepted a stagnant business growth model. However, a few have begun to see huge success with a 2,000 year old tool that has none of the sexiness of a celebrity endorsement or the award winning graphics of a Madison Avenue advertising firm. That tool is a simple handwritten note. A Midwestern restaurant owner sent out a series of handwritten notes to his customers and had a 20% response rate. A financial planner in the Northeast sent out just 80 handwritten notes to touch base with prospects and had 6 people call him and 2 set appointments. A non-profit was able to get 51 donations by simply sending a handwritten note to warm list of 100 people. Why? Handwritten notes are special. Clients cannot...

Read More

Billboards, Banners, and the Evolving Nature of Online Advertising

Billboards, Banners, and the Evolving Nature of Online Advertising Two authors explore the comparison of Web banners to highway billboards. by Dan Wasserman and Anne McKay Editor’s Note: I am combining (with permission) two postings from the Internet Advertising Discussion List. The complete I-Advertising Archives are at http://guava.ease.lsoft.com/archives/i-advertising.html Dan: All media have gone through an initial stage where the commercial message was composed by the medium itself rather than creative experts. Newspapers and magazines developed ads for their clients, radio stations have commercial copy writers, and many TV stations still will shoot a “cheap” commercial. This phase was always the least effective use of the medium as a commercial vehicle. It took time for standards to evolve and for the respective areas of expertise (media and creative) to diverge. Often in the early days, the ads appearing on/in a new medium were enhancements, or modifications, of the highest level of the art in the prior medium (e.g. early radio was newspaper copy read live and TV started basically as radio with pictures). On the web, some ads have mimicked TV ads. The evolution to a unique and higher plane is what is currently happening with the web. At present, banners ARE effectively billboards, or perhaps abbreviated magazine ads. Although they have the power of interactivity, if the message is unclear (or has no relevance to the user at that...

Read More

Recent Comments

    Archives

    Categories