Month: March 1969

A Brief History of the Internet–B.C. (Before Commercialism) (1)

A Brief History of the Internet–B.C. (Before Commercialism) How the Internet developed from its early beginnings as a research tool into the fastest growing marketing environment in the world. by Shel Horowitz The roots of the Internet go back to the 1960s and the height of the Cold War. The U.S. military, in preparation for a possible nuclear war, sought a means to ensure communication in the event of an enemy missile attack. The network would need to be able to withstand large scale destruction, yet deliver uninterrupted service. At the time, a direct hit on a central point would disable the entire network. The Rand Corporation suggested building a network without a central control point so the system would not be vulnerable to a direct hit on a single location. To accommodate this requirement, a new kind of network was devised. A special communication standard, called TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol), was designed to direct the flow of data between computers on the network and around possibly damaged sections. Thus, TCP/IP increased the survivability and reliability of the network, even in the case of war. In 1969, a group of Department of Defense researchers working for the Advanced Research Projects Agency linked computers at UCLA, Stanford Research Institute, the University of Utah, and the University of California at Santa Barbara to create the network. The message, “Are you...

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A Brief History of the Internet–B.C. (Before Commercialism)

A Brief History of the Internet–B.C. (Before Commercialism) How the Internet developed from its early beginnings as a research tool into the fastest growing marketing environment in the world. by Shel Horowitz The roots of the Internet go back to the 1960s and the height of the Cold War. The U.S. military, in preparation for a possible nuclear war, sought a means to ensure communication in the event of an enemy missile attack. The network would need to be able to withstand large scale destruction, yet deliver uninterrupted service. At the time, a direct hit on a central point would disable the entire network. The Rand Corporation suggested building a network without a central control point so the system would not be vulnerable to a direct hit on a single location. To accommodate this requirement, a new kind of network was devised. A special communication standard, called TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol), was designed to direct the flow of data between computers on the network and around possibly damaged sections. Thus, TCP/IP increased the survivability and reliability of the network, even in the case of war. In 1969, a group of Department of Defense researchers working for the Advanced Research Projects Agency linked computers at UCLA, Stanford Research Institute, the University of Utah, and the University of California at Santa Barbara to create the network. The message, “Are you...

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