Month: March 1500

More Money or the Pursuit of Happiness? (1)

More Money or the Pursuit of Happiness? By C.J. Hayden We self-employed professionals are constantly faced with difficult choices about how to best grow our businesses. Should I pursue this line of business or that one? Would it serve me better to choose Niche A or Niche B? Shall I spend my time building a relationship with Client X or Client Y? Often, these questions hinge on what we perceive as the most desirable result. If we value potential earnings more highly, we select a course of action that will lead to more money. If we are more concerned with our personal fulfillment, we follow a path that we believe will be more satisfying. Surprisingly often, these possible choices point in opposite directions. We find ourselves having to choose between higher earnings and greater happiness. Or at least, that’s what we think. A client of mine who worked as a marketing consultant was presented with two potential projects — one with a large law firm specializing in mergers and acquisitions, and another with a small environmental services company. My client, a longtime environmentalist, was drawn to the smaller company, but it was clear the law firm could pay more and give her more business in the long run. Both projects required a detailed proposal; she couldn’t do both, and had to choose. Practicality dictated that she pursue the law...

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More Money or the Pursuit of Happiness?

More Money or the Pursuit of Happiness? By C.J. Hayden We self-employed professionals are constantly faced with difficult choices about how to best grow our businesses. Should I pursue this line of business or that one? Would it serve me better to choose Niche A or Niche B? Shall I spend my time building a relationship with Client X or Client Y? Often, these questions hinge on what we perceive as the most desirable result. If we value potential earnings more highly, we select a course of action that will lead to more money. If we are more concerned with our personal fulfillment, we follow a path that we believe will be more satisfying. Surprisingly often, these possible choices point in opposite directions. We find ourselves having to choose between higher earnings and greater happiness. Or at least, that’s what we think. A client of mine who worked as a marketing consultant was presented with two potential projects — one with a large law firm specializing in mergers and acquisitions, and another with a small environmental services company. My client, a longtime environmentalist, was drawn to the smaller company, but it was clear the law firm could pay more and give her more business in the long run. Both projects required a detailed proposal; she couldn’t do both, and had to choose. Practicality dictated that she pursue the law...

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Social Media Superstars

Social Media Superstars at Blogworld By Shel Horowitz Highlights of their presentations, as reported by Shel Horowitz, Editor, Down to Business Scott Stratten—7 deadly sins of social media: Apathy Apathy is the biggest enemy of social media—in part because we send untargeted uninteresting invites for nonevents. We’re breaking social—one of the greatest tools we’ve ever had (Half the room have turned off their Facebook invitation notifications—show of hands) Pinterest is 97% women—and me. Web innovations come from passion, and then the profiteers come in and kill it. And they outsource it to clueless overseas people. Whole Foods is really good at social. They understand it’s more important to be a catalyst for conversation, to add value, than to sell food [directly]. They feature kitchens on one pinboard, and they don’t sell kitchens. 30,000 people followed it. Someone suggested they do a vegan board, and they set it up: 38,000 followers. I search Pinterset for my URL, every time someone posts about me. And I go to that board and say thank you—that’s my social strategy, to thank people who are talking about me. And they’re like, Wow, he replied. Pride To be great at social media, you only have to be average, because everyone else sucks at it. Rush Fitness Complex posted a notice that negative posts will be removed. You don’t make the rules in social! You should...

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Small Fish Hunting Whales

Small Fish Hunting Whales By Barbara Weaver Smith This is an excerpt from Whale Hunting Women: How Women Do Big Deals by Barbara Weaver Smith Every day people ask us, how big does my company have to be to hunt whales? Or, do The Whale Hunters have anything to offer a really small company? Those are good questions. Let’s start with how small is “small?” The Small Business Act says a small business concern is “one that is independently owned and operated and which is not dominant in its field of operation.” In some industries SBA counts a “small business” as one with fewer than 1500 employees or less than $40 million in annual revenues. Sounds pretty big to me. Among The Whale Hunters current clients, a “small” company may be as large as $100 million although most are smaller. But the owners who ask that question are much, much smaller. Is whale hunting for you? Many companies start out as whale hunters. Think about how your company got started. You started out by selling to whales-federal and state governments, school systems, or general contractors who are required to have small business and minority business suppliers. Whale hunting was your sales strategy from day one. You were an employee who resigned or retired from a job in a whale company. Turned entrepreneur, you provide services to the whale as...

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